How To Avoid Oral Disease Progression

Oral diseases don't just happen overnight! It's our daily habits and ongoing choices that affect the delicate balance of bacteria that reside in our mouth.

Excellent oral hygiene and nutritious food choices will help keep our "good bugs" happy and our oral microbiomes balanced. A harmonious community of bacteria will help keep your mouth disease-free! But a diet of processed foods and refined sugars can tip the scales and cause a spiral of bacterial dysbiosis, inflammation and disease.

Oral Disease Progression



How can you avoid throwing your oral microbiome out of whack?

1. Eat whole foods - foods that are rich in nutritious vitamins and minerals come straight from the earth and are not processed or man-made. Fruits, vegetables, meat, nuts, seeds, oats and grains are examples of whole foods. Rule of thumb: if it comes from a box or a bag and has more than 1-2 ingredients it's usually processed. 

2. Eat or supplement important vitamins and minerals that your teeth and gums need to stay strong and healthy. Some great tooth-healthy vitamins and minerals are calcium, Vitamin-D, Potassium, Phosphorous, Vitamin-C, Vitamin-A and Vitamin-K.

3. Avoid snacking throughout the day and eat 3-4 balanced meals. Frequent snacking does not allow your teeth to take a break from the acid that is produced in your mouth while you eat, so your enamel becomes soft and weak.

4. Brush and floss daily (yes, we said floss!) 

5. Take a dental probiotic to replenish the good bacteria in your mouth, and a prebiotic to keep those bugs alive and thriving (SUPER TEETH Dental Probiotic has both!) 

6. Chew a xylitol based gum after meals to get your saliva flowing. Saliva helps neutralize the acidity in your mouth after eating, and it helps remineralize your teeth by pulling calcium and phosphate back into the teeth. 


7. Visit the dentist at least 2x/year. Make sure to find a dentist that treats your mouth as a part of your whole body health. We like this Functional Dentist Directory put together by Dr. Mark Burhenne.